Student author hopes book will help fight mental health stigma

A WINSTON-SALEM state university student who recently published a book after going through it, Don’t be traumatized. He hopes to guide others on their own journey to self-love. EVERYONE’S STORY, race, color you may be, male or female, because mental health affects everyone. DIAMANTE CLEMMONS lost his father at the age of nine to gun violence after navigating years of depression and loneliness. CLEMMONS began to pursue his own sufferings. Football, Getting involved in school and learning who he is outside of his own trauma. I know when I lost my father for a long time, I didn’t let myself cry or really feel what I was going through, because I felt that there were certain things that a man should feel and that I felt that I felt. YOU AS THE HEAD OF THE HOUSE. He began to learn what it means to find self-love, and most of all, grace. PUTTING YOURSELF IN THAT PLACE TO FEEL SAD, TIRED, HAPPY, WHATEVER IT IS, IS GOING TO GET YOU THROUGH. AND I FEEL LIKE ONCE YOU GIVE YOURSELF THAT GRACE, THAT’S WHEN YOU CAN RENEW. That’s when you’re even more resilient because you get in when you’re down. Meanwhile, Gemini was healing. WRITE I’M THE BLUE BOY, AND HE’S NOT BLUE ANYMORE. Instead, his skin is a deep brown that he grew to love. THAT’S WHY THE GRAIN EVENT HAPPENED. Whatever life throws at me, I’m going to throw something back. FUTURE MANAGEMENT. SO TO ME, AGAINST THE ISLAND ABOUT THE COMPANY. AFTER HE SELF-PUBLISHED HIS BOOK, SUPPORT CAME IN FROM HIS PEERS AND PROFESSORS AT WCBS. MORE AND IT REALLY IS LIKE AN UNREAL FEELING. I can’t even explain it because I’m still in front of them laughing too hard. BUT I NEED IT. GEMINI, THE MISSION IS NOW TO FIGHT AGAINST THE STIGMA OF INTELLECTUAL HEALTH. AFTER WHAT I WROTE, IT WAS MORE DIFFICULT TO BE THAT I PROMISED MYSELF. A promise that I would never let myself get that low. A promise that you would like, stay and hold fast to my dreams. So writing was a genre just for me, just inspired me. THAT’S THE BEST WAY TO FIND OUT. MUST. After graduating from WINSTON-SALEM STATE in the spring, DUMONT hopes to pursue a career in law enforcement. I have a link to his book against hate on our website.

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A first-generation high school and WSSU student self-published a book on mental health, trauma

A first-generation high school and Winston-Salem State University student published a book on mental health after learning how to deal with trauma. Jahmonte Clemmons hopes that Against the Grain will lead others on their own path of love. “It’s a good read for everyone, any race, any color, male or female because mental health affects everyone,” Clemmons said. At the age of nine, Clemmons lost his father to gun violence. After navigating years of depression and loneliness, Clemmons began to pursue his own passions in life. Things like playing football, getting involved in school and learning who he is outside of his own trauma. “I know when I lost my father for a long time I didn’t let myself cry or feel what I was going through. , because there are certain things that a person should feel and certain things that I would do as the head of the house.” He began to learn what it means to find self-love and above all, grace. “Instead to allow yourself to feel sad, tired, happy, whatever it is will get you through it. Once you give yourself that grace, that’s when you can restore, that’s when you’re even more resilient, because you admit when you’re down,” Clemmons explained. At at the same time he was healing, he was writing and that’s how ‘In the Face of the Grain’ came into being. “Whatever life throws at me, I’m going to hit it back, something even harder, so for me, Against the Grain is about not giving up.” After he self-published his book, support from his peers and professors at WSSU poured in. “It’s an unreal feeling that I can’t even describe, I’m trying not to laugh.” very difficult, but I love it,” he said. His mission now is to combat the stigma of mental health. to myself, a promise that I wouldn’t let myself go so low, a promise that I would stay put, and that I would live my dream, writing was my clothing and that was the best way I better see it, hug.” After graduating from WSSU in Spring 2023, Clemmons hopes to pursue a career in law enforcement. Click here for his book, Against the Grain.

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A first-generation high school and Winston-Salem State University student published a book on mental health after learning how to deal with trauma.

Jahmonte Clemmons hopefully Against the Grain he will guide others on the path of self-love.

“It’s a good read for everyone, any race, any color, male or female because mental health affects everyone,” Clemmons said.

At the age of nine, Clemmons lost his father to gun violence. After navigating years of depression and loneliness, Clemmons began to pursue his own passions in life. Things like playing football, getting involved in school and learning who he is outside of his own trauma.

“I know when I lost my father for a long time I didn’t let myself cry or feel what I was going through, because there are some things that a man should to feel and some things I would do as the head of a household.”

He began to learn what it means to find self-love and above all, grace. “Instead to allow yourself to feel sad, tired, happy, whatever it is will get you through it. Once you give yourself that grace, that’s when you can restore, that’s when you’re even more resilient, because you admit when you’re down,” Clemmons explained.

At the same time he was healing, he was writing and that’s how ‘The Face of the Grain’ came into being.

“Whatever life throws at me, I’m going to hit back, something even harder, so for me, Against the Grain it’s about not giving up. “

After he self-published his book, support came from his peers and professors at WSSU. “It’s an unreal feeling that I can’t even explain, I’m trying not to laugh too hard, but I love it,” he said.

His mission now is to combat the stigma of mental health. He said, “It was a promise to myself, a promise that I would not allow myself to be so low. A promise that I would stay put and stick fast to my dreams. Writing was a costume for me. That the best way I see it, a hook.”

After graduating from WSSU in Spring 2023, Clemmons hopes to pursue a career in law enforcement. Click here for his book, Against the Grain.

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